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BigBrotherPenton
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2009 3:26 pm    Post subject: Rule of the Week 8 - 804.05 Disqualification and Suspension Reply with quote

804.05 Disqualification and Suspension

A. A player shall be disqualified by the director for meeting any of the necessary conditions of disqualification as set forth in the rules, or for any of the following:
(1) Unsportsmanlike conduct, such as; loud cursing, throwing things in anger (other than discs in play), or overt rudeness to anyone present.
(2) Willful and overt destruction or abuse of plant life, course hardware, or any other property considered part of the disc golf course or the park.
(3) Cheating: a willful attempt to circumvent the rules of play.
(4) Activities which are in violation of the law or park regulation or disc golf course rule, including the illegal consumption of drugs or alcohol.

Directors are granted the discretion to disqualify a player based on the severity of the offending conduct. An official warning of disqualification may be issued by a director where appropriate.

B. Disqualified players shall forfeit any prize money and shall not receive a refund of entry fees.

C. A player in violation of any section under 804.05 A is also subject to suspension from the PDGA Tour. Suspension from the PDGA Tour may only be assigned by the PDGA Commissioner. A player may appeal his or her suspension to the PDGA Board of Directors. The determination to suspend, and the length of the suspension, shall be based on the severity of the action and the extent to which the player may have committed repeated violations.
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Thumber
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

how often has this actually happened here in Ottawa? I have heard of a few suspensions handed out by the PDGA. Not sure what the reason for those suspensions was.
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burjwahzeh
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thumber wrote:
how often has this actually happened here in Ottawa? I have heard of a few suspensions handed out by the PDGA. Not sure what the reason for those suspensions was.

I don't think anyone in Ottawa has ever been suspended. Certainly not as a result of actions at an ODGC event.

I'd like to highlight one of the most significant elements of this rule, though:
Quote:
A player shall be disqualified by the director for ... Cheating: a willful attempt to circumvent the rules of play.


An entire card could be disqualified if together they agree to willfully circumvent the rules of play. It's called "cheating" in the rules. Cheating is only a fair name for this where the circumventing of the rules is willful, which implies having knowledge that you are breaking a rule.

Have you ever looked down at your lie and wished it was six inches to the right so that you would have a better shot?

I have. It happened just a week ago at Flat Mountain. I gacked my drive when the others on my card sent theirs to the target.

Have you ever placed you foot where you wish your disc landed and prepared to make your shot?

I did. It made my next shot way more open. I was able to easily throw a forehand around a thick bush because of it, and the footing was much better, too.

Have you looked to see if anyone else on your card has noticed that you're taking a stance that is a little more "plumb" than it should be?

I did. There was no way they could see my foot. I had made so many bad shots that day. Here was my chance to make a shot I could feel good about.

Of course, everything comes down to what happens next.

If you take the shot from the "wishful thinking" lie, you might make your recovery and you'll be on your way to a good score. Chances are everyone else on the card will score as well or better than you anyways. What's the harm in that? What does it matter if you help yourself catch a little break every now and again?

The harm is in that YOU ARE CHEATING. Did anyone catch you? Maybe not this time. No, likely not. Can you feel good about your game afterwards? I would venture to guess that if you understand how important this rule is, you could only feel good about what you did if you are psychologically ill (I'm not a psychologist, but there has to be a name for this sort of disorder; dillusional thinking, perhaps).

How can you feel good about tricking everyone, including yourself, about playing a game that has hidden within it these little pockets of rot?

If you accept that you were never meant to make that shot and instead line up where you should have, then all the rest becomes just wishful thinking. Golf is full of wishful thinking. There's nothing wrong with having a little hope, and you can wish all you want until its time to throw. Once it's time, there's no room for wishes.

Temptations like this present themselves many times during a typical round of golf. As tempting as it was to take the easy stance, it was the legal stance that I took. The shot I made was nothing more than just another boring recovery shot. It will never be remembered as anything else.

It had a much greater effect than that, though. It allowed me to maintain confidence that I am an honest golfer. It allowed me to face head-on one of the challenges that is the foundation of the game. It won me no accolades, but I did uphold the integrity of my person and the rules of the game.

If a person should ever make the other decision, the rule is clear on how they should be treated. If they can't be relied upon to take the rot out of their own game, the game provides that the rot can be thrown out.

To realize this yourself is honourable.

To be made to realize it through disqualification is disgraceful.


Last edited by burjwahzeh on Wed Jun 10, 2009 3:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
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surge
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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burjwahzeh
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a follow-up, I'd like to draw your attention to the first post on this page:
Click here and read the first post.
Here, a player asked to be disqualified because he knew that handling his situation in any other way would have given him an unfair advantage. That an incorrect score was submitted and allowed was an unfortunate mistake, but to continue to play by it would amount to cheating.

He felt that allowing it to count was a willful attempt to circumvent the rules of the game. He volunteered his own disqualification.

In my mind, his decision demonstrated the pinacle of honourable action and demonstrated the importance of personal accountability.

It is the only time I have ever felt jubilant about the prospects of disqualifying a player. I could see that hidden there, deep within one of the ugliest rules of golf, was the most admirable demonstrations of sportsmanship.


Last edited by burjwahzeh on Wed Jun 10, 2009 3:34 pm; edited 3 times in total
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OMR
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

burjwahzeh wrote:

....
An entire card could be disqualified if together they agree to willfully circumvent the rules of play. It's called "cheating" in the rules. Cheating is only a fair name for this where the circumventing of the rules is willful, which implies having knowledge that you are breaking a rule.
...


so here's a question: what about if the entire card gives the go-ahead for a player to take a science shot during tournament (e.g. TOSS) play? Could they be disqualified?
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burjwahzeh
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OMR wrote:
so here's a question: what about if the entire card gives the go-ahead for a player to take a science shot during tournament (e.g. TOSS) play? Could they be disqualified?

Absolutely.
Of course, where the player volunteers that he made the practice throw and he does so prior to the end of the tournament, there would only be a need to apply a penalty for the practice throw. Again, an example of sportsmanlike conduct.

It's a bitter, bitter pill to swallow, but you'll find it quite easy, perhaps even liberating, on the stomach.


Last edited by burjwahzeh on Wed Jun 10, 2009 7:56 pm; edited 1 time in total
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burjwahzeh
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Functional MRIs can now be used to test your honesty.

Click here for the summary aritcle.
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